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Juliette



Based on William Shakespeare's character Juliet, when she sees Romeo for the first time.
Technique: Mixed on canvas
Measurements: 60 cm x 80 cm
Year: 2012

Juliette - Visual 1 Juliette



Requiem Ophelia



 It is a memorial to the late character of Ophelia in Hamlet by William Shakespeare.
Considering that the memory lingers until it fades entirely, this picture emits light at night that evokes the memory that has not disappeared.
This picture is based on a character and hers characteristics are reflected in the nature that surrounds it.
Flowers are the main topic (symbolic element for the character ) the colors on the water reflect the strength,the density of its madness, anguish and blood that existed at the time of the death of Ophelia.
Technique: Mixed media on canvas
Measurements: 10 cm x 85 cm
Year: 2012

Requiem Ophelia



Surprise



Based on Lewis Carroll's character in "Alice in Wonderland"
Technique: Mixed
Measurements: 40 cm x 40 cm
Year: 2011

Surprise



Hat



Based on Lewis Carroll's character in "Alice in Wonderland"
This particular painting is complemented with surprise.
Technique: Mixed
Medidas: 40 cm x 40 cm
Year: 2011

Hat



Jack



Irish folk legend
Many, many years ago, a miser and Irish brawler named Jack, had the misfortune to
meet the devil in a tavern in Halloween. Jack, known drunk, had drunk
much but could trick the Devil offering his soul in exchange for one last drink.
The devil was transformed into a coin to pay the bartender, but Jack quickly took it and put
in her purse, as Jack had a cross in his purse, the devil could not return to its original shape.
Jack would not go to hell until he promised not to ask her soul in 10 years. The devil had no
but to give Jack his claim.
Ten years later, Jack met the devil in the field, the devil would be prepared for the soul
Jack, but Jack thought quickly and said: "I will go willingly, but before you do it, bring me the
apple tree is in that please ". The devil thought he had nothing to lose, and a jump
reached the top of the tree, but before the devil knew it, Jack had quickly carved
cross into the tree trunk. Then the Devil could not come down. Jack the devil made him promise never to
I would ask her soul again. The devil had no choice but to accept.
Jack died a few years later, but could not enter heaven, because during his life he had been a gulf,
drunk and a swindler. But when I tried to enter, at least, in the dreadful hell, the devil had
to send it back, he could not take his soul (he promised). "Where will I go now?" Asked
Jack, and the devil answered: "Go back where you came from." The way back was dark and terrible wind
not let him see anything. The devil tossed Jack a burning coal directly from hell, to be
guide in the darkness, and Jack put in a turnip he was eating, so it does not turn off with the wind.
Jack was doomed to wander in darkness forever...
The people of Celtic origin, as tradition dictated coal hollowed turnips and put them to
light the way back to the world of the living to their dearest dead and so gave them the
Welcome, both were protected from evil spirits. But when the Irish came to America,
pumpkins met and realized that these were much larger and easier to hollow out
than turnips, from that time that no person has grown up knowing a Jack-o-lantern,
Jack the dark lantern.
Technique: Oil on canvas
Measurements: 40 cm x 40 cm

Jack



Tanabata



Tanabata is inspired by the famous fairy princess Asian and pastor.
Orihime (织 姫, Princess Weaver) was the daughter of Tentei (天帝, the Heavenly King). Orihime wove fabrics splendid riverside Amanogawa (天の川, the Milky Way). His father loved his paintings, and she worked hard every day to have them ready, but because of their work the princess could not meet someone to be in love, which greatly saddened the princess. Worried about his daughter, her father arranged a meeting between her and Hikoboshi (彦 星, also known as Kengyuu, 牵 牛), a shepherd who lived across the river Amanogawa. When the two met and fell in love instantly, shortly after they married. However, once married Orihime, began to neglect his work and did weaving for her father, while Hikoboshi paying less and less attention to their livestock, which ended scattering by Heaven. Furious, the Heavenly King separated the lovers, one on each side of Amanogawa, prohibiting them look. Orihime, desperate for the loss of her husband, asked his father to be again. His father, moved by her tears, agreed that the lovers saw the seventh day of the seventh month, on condition that Orihime had completed its work. However, the first time I tried to be realized that they could not cross the river because there was no bridge at all. Orihime cried so much that a flock of magpies came to his aid and promised that they would make a bridge with their wings so they could cross the river. Both lovers met and magpies finally promised to come every year as long as it did not rain. When given this circumstance, the lovers have to wait to meet until the following year.
Today in Japan, people usually celebrate this day by writing wishes, sometimes in the form of poems, on small pieces of paper or tanzaku (短 册 tanzaku?), And hanging from the branches of bamboo trees, sometimes along with other decorations . The bamboo and decorations are often placed afloat on a river or burned after the festival, around midnight or the next day.
Technique: Mixed
Measurements: 40 cm x 40 cm

Tanabata



Water



Based on the play "On the harm it does the snuff" by Anton Chekhov 1886.
Technique: Oil on canvas
Measurements: 60 cm x 45 cm
Year: 2009

Water



DIB9



Is part of a series of 11 drawings with different measures, belonging to the Volatil would be based on the concept of temporality and distortion of reality.
Technique: Ink on paper
Measurements: 16 cm x 20 cm

DIB9



No one believes in fairy tales



Technique: Pinhole camera
Measurements: 10 cm x 15 cm Each one
Year: 2003



  • No one believes in fairy tales 1/13
  • No one believes in fairy tales 2/13
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